Tag Archives: Spiel des Jahres

Up for the Cup! – Camel Up review

Combining his best investigative journalist hat with his wrestling singlet, Stuart returns to pass judgement on the latest addition to the line-up of Spiel des Jahres winners. While the favourite was undoubtedly Splendor, the crown was eventually taken by Camel Up – and here’s what The Judge has to say on the matter…

Camel Up COVER

Today’s review features a game that, since becoming an unlikely winner of the Spiel des Jahres prize in Germany, raised more questions than answers. I am here to resolve these questions.

1) Should this game have won against worthy rivals Concept and Splendor?

Yes. Concept is more of an activity (albeit an enjoyable one) than a competitive game – especially in so much as like one of my favourite party games Telestrations, dishing out points adds absolutely nothing to the fun of the to the proceedings. Splendor is fun, functional and quick, but it’s also dry. Like, “water biscuit that has spent six weeks in the trench left by a sand snake’s underbelly” dry. I don’t dislike it, but I don’t love it either. The winner of the prize is ultimately better than the other nominees.

2) Should this game sit alongside other former winners Carcassonne, Alhambra, Ticket to Ride, Dominion and Dixit as games that will stand the test of time and be fondly remembered in five or ten years’ time? Or will it fade like Quirkle, Keltis and Thurn & Taxis as footnotes “What? That won the SDJ?”

Time will tell, but my instinct is that very few people will be playing this year’s winner when the 2020 awards are announced. The same will not be true of Carc. Or TTR.

3) What the hell is the name of the game?

Camel Up!

Or Camel Cup!

Ok, I don’t know the answer to this one – but it definitely features Camels.

Camel (C)up is a game where 3-8 players adopt the identity of tourists or natives who bet on the multi-coloured camel racing that passes before them. On a turn, players will do one of four things:

  1. Draw a die from an awesome cardboard pyramid – then roll it to move a camel of that colour 1,2 or 3 spaces forward around the track.
  2. Take a token to bet on who will be the leading camel at the end of the current leg (a leg ending when each camel has moved)
  3. Add an oasis / desert tile which moves camels forward / back one space if they land on it
  4. Place a card to bet on who the overall winner of the race / overall loser of the race will be. More points will be awarded for the earlier you commit to a decision.

The twist, and much of the deduction, comes from the face that the camels stack up (Camel UP then, obviously) when they land on each other – and the camel on top is winning – and will therefore receive the championship cup if it crosses the line first (so it’s Camel Cup…obviously.)

So, blue is in last place – and no one is betting on him to win. If he moves first, though, and lands on the white camel and white then moves next and lands on the yellow camel (the current leader) then blue is in the lead. Deducing the odds, and having the foresight to bet early and bet big is the key to victory in Camel…. this camel racing game.

Camel Up PLAY

Beautifully produced, looks good, plays great – no wonder it took the crown!

So take this as a measured recommendation. The game pieces are of excellent quality – all the tiles are brightly coloured and clear. The odd cardboard pyramid of dice distribution is a more thematic version of a dice bag, and only adds to the toy factor – alongside the attractive and tactile stacking camel meeples (Cameeples!)

In summary – the game is great fun, if a little lightweight and somewhat disposable, but plays quickly (around 30 mins) and just as well with 8 as it does with 3 and also hits the criteria of a Spiel des Jahres winner of being easy to learn and more than suitable for families. If history is any indication, Christmas Day tea in many German homes will undoubtedly see some frantic Camel on Camel action this festive period.

(Michael – just check that last paragraph, worried there may be some innuendo I have missed? – Stuart) [No, you’re fine, I didn’t spot anything – Michael]

Camel Up (and it IS Camel Up, the designer said so!) was released by eggertspiel and designed by Stefen Bogen. Between two and eight can play with games taking about half an hour. Personally, I think this is a great addition to the SdJ award winner list and think that the dice-shaking pyramid is one of the best accessories around. If you fancy picking up a copy yourself, why not head to Gameslore where you can grab it for around £20! Bargain!

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Another Chance – Las Vegas review

Las Vegas COVER

Regular readers (and there is such a thing) will know that one of my favourite games is the criminally underrated Lords of Vegas. It’s a great game, really capturing the birth of the City of Sin as you and your fellow players attempt to create your own casinos while merging into and taking over others. Of course, the entire thing is driven by dice, precisely the engine you would expect in a game built around the home of gambling, as someone who loves the randomness that they bring to a game, I’ll happily sit down and play most things where they’re in the box.

Last week a copy of Rudiger Dorn’s 2012 release Las Vegas dropped onto my doorstep, and again it’s a box that’s full to the brim with six-siders. Now, while it may not be as thematically impressive as Lords, it still hits the required areas of seeing plenty of dice rolling and getting yourself lots of money, and has hit our tabletop pretty regularly thanks to a combination of push your luck and important decision making. I actually first played it at last year’s Spiel with two Germans and a French guy, none of whom spoke a word of English, but thanks to some basic language skills and some high quality gesturing, I got that hang of it pretty quickly.

Over the course of four rounds, players are looking to accrue the most money, with the highest total at the end of play declared the winner. Six tiles, each one representing a non-copyright infringing but rather familiar looking casino and numbered from one to six, are laid out between the players. Cards are then laid out by these tiles, each with a monetary value from $10,000 all the way up to $90,000, with a minimum of $50K required for each casino. In other words, if the first card you dealt out for a tile was worth $40,000, you add a second card immediately.

It’s then time for dice rolling, with the players initially taking eight of their own colour and two neutral white dice in hand, then hurling them with wreckless abandon on the table. They’re then grouped by value – all the ones together, the twos, etc. – and a decision must then be made. All of the dice of a single value, whether they’re in your own colour or white, must be placed on the corresponding casino tile. Your final aim, after everyone’s dice have been put into play, is to have the single highest amount of dice on a tile, as doing so allows you to take the money card for that round.

It’s here where the decision making part of the game comes in. Sure, there may be a middling card on one casino, but do you want to throw away half of your dice so early on in the round to almost guaranteeing that you’ll get it? What happens if later on another player ends up bettering your total, leaving you with nothing to show for your early investment? As dice have to be added to tiles every single time you roll, there’s always a danger that they could end up utterly useless. Such are the vagaries of chance!

So, this a

So, this actually happened in a recent game. Final round, two players fighting over a very important $70,000. Back and forth it went, one six here, another there, until they both ended up with eight dice each and walked away with nothing. That final, spiteful roll of a single six was utterly incredible.

As in the city itself, the underdog is always in with a chance, even if they’re down to their final dice. You see, it’s all about having the single highest amount of dice, meaning that if a situation arises where a couple of players both have three or four dice on a tile, you can sneak in and steal the cash with only one sat there. It’s even funnier when you manage to take the card by adding white dice – they almost act as a virtual fifth player, screwing up the plans of the real people sat at the table, so never underestimate their strength until they’ve all been placed.

When the round is done and the cards are doled out, you’ll generally find that each casino will only have one to be claimed. However, in the case of those that have multiple cards, there can actually be more than one winner, as long as their total amount of dice doesn’t equal anyone else’s. A recent game I played had three cards up for grabs, where two $20,000s were followed up with a very appealing $80,000, ending up in a frenzy of dice being thrown to the claim pile – six, four and three in the end. Still, at least everyone left that casino with some money in their pocket. It’s quite easy to be stitched up by the white player and end up penniless.

Despite its initial simplicity, I’ve grown to really quite like Las Vegas. With the opportunity to make decisions in the game being somewhat limited by what you roll, it’s a perfect game to fill a half hour gap or to round out an evening. You don’t have to put a huge amount of thought into the game because most of the options are taken out of your hands – just roll the dice, see what will bring in the most potential money while reacting to what others have done, then allow play to move on. While there’s pretty much zero interaction in the actual game, you’ll find yourself willing others to roll badly, or curse them openly when a particularly valuable casino falls straight into their laps – the metagame in this one is great.

From a production standpoint… well, it’s hard to screw up dice and cards, and Ravensburger have done their usual job of providing solid components throughout. The casino tiles are of a decent thickness, the cards are grand, the dice are pretty standard – but really, Las Vegas isn’t about the bits and pieces. Your focus should be on that next turn and hoping, praying, that you roll just enough to claim the big money. After all, too many dice on a tile is wasteful, and a good gambler never wants to overpay.

Las Vegas was designed by Rudiger Dorn and released through Ravensburger in 2012. Nominated for the 2012 Spiel des Jahres, between two and five can play (though I think it’s better at the higher end, four or five is best) with games taking about 20-30 minutes. Copies can be grabbed for around £18 from Gameslore, so go pay them a visit! Oh, and if you fancy checking out the first Little Metal Television video that looks at Las Vegas, behold!

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Crossfire – Hanabi review

Hanabi COVER

The 2013 Spiel des Jahres is announced next Monday (July 8th) and I’m pretty sure that the winner is going to be a tiny wee game from Antoine Bauza called Hanabi. While he’s previously won the Kennerspiel with 7 Wonders, he’s never taken the big prize – however, this little co-op card game about putting on a fireworks display truly feels like it’s got what it takes. Hanabi should, by rights, end up on Game of the Year lists all over the place when 2013 draws to a close. It’s honestly that good.

From the off you realise that Hanabi does things a little differently. Years of muscle memory and instinct are cast aside from the moment you pick up your cards, as you never actually get to see what you’re holding. Plenty of mistakes will be made when players pick up a new card and glance at it, destroying the whole idea behind the game – but you soon learn to be careful, sliding the card across the table and diligently adding it to your hand. Your collective task is simple – to create five lines of cards, numbered one to five, in five different colours – and the explanation of how to play takes mere moments. Eight tokens sit on the table, white on one side, black on the other, and it’s these that drive the game.

Each turn, you get to choose from one of three options. Flipping a white token to its black side lets you give some information to a fellow player – pointing at cards they hold and saying “these cards are yellow” or “this card is a 2” is the order of the day. What the player does with these details is entirely up to them, but generally they’ll be shuffling their cards around in a desperate bid to remember everything that they’ve been told throughout the game so far. Rotating a card, holding is sideways… whatever system you use to recall what you’re holding is legal, as long as you don’t look at the faces.

Option 2 is to discard a card you hold. Flipping a token from black back to white lets you throw a card from the game, never to be used again, but this can be both a blessing and a curse. You may well think you know exactly what you have in your hand, but there have been countless times when I’ve seen people get rid of something that they could have used. Sure, it buys you back another chance to pass around some more information, but there’s little more gutting than seeing someone chuck away a valuable 5 card. With the ten cards in each colour divided unevenly (1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 4 and 5), keeping track on what you can viably discard without ruining your team’s chances is vital.

These are the cards that will infuriate and delight. Also, you'll notice that they've been designed with colour blind gamers in mind. Always a nice touch.

These are the cards that will infuriate and delight. Also, you’ll notice that they’ve been designed with colour blind gamers in mind. Always a nice touch.

Your final choice is to simply play a card to the table, either starting one of the five colour lines or adding to one already begun. If you are correct and the card is legal, excellent! You add to your collective score, hopefully making your way ever closer to the maximum 25 points that can only be attained by getting all five 5 cards in play (my best so far is a healthy 19 – not bad, but not so good… plenty of room for improvement). Should you manage to play an incorrect card, you anger the gods who send a lightning bolt your way as they fight to ruin your show; three of them and it’s game over.

Sharing of information, playing or discarding cards… that’s all there is in Hanabi. And yet, despite its simplicity, there is so much tension and pressure to deal with it ends up feeling like more of a challenge than fifty cards should be able to provide. You’ll find that you never really have enough information to definitely guarantee everything you hold in your hand. In fact, focusing solely on that is a quick route to losing the game for your team. Sure, you need to do your best to remember what you’ve got, but must also consider what your friends have as well as what’s been played or removed from the game. Hanabi swiftly becomes a high pressure situation where you find you’re second guessing yourself constantly while praying the other people around your table don’t take what you’ve said in the wrong fashion.

It’s the information sharing that truly makes the game enjoyable. Seeing someone point out that a player is Very Specifically Holding A Useful Card That They Should Probably Play Soon, only to have them annoyingly hold onto it while trying to help out others is so gloriously frustrating… there’s no game like it. The looks of anguish that flash across players’ faces as they desperately try to recall what they were told three rounds ago are hilarious, and the feeling of satisfaction when you actually manage to successfully add to a line is unmatched. Such a huge amount of gameplay in a tiny package is a great thing to behold – and that’s not even the whole story.

You see, there’s another set of ten cards in there too. This multicoloured group can be used in a couple of ways, either making your life easier or much, much trickier. Your game can be simplified by using them as wild cards where they act as any colour you like, or you may choose to ramp up the difficulty by using them as a sixth set. Whether you’re looking to simplify things (especially when playing with younger gamers) or feel like a bit more of a challenge, it’s great to see that you have options.

Oh yeah, and you can get the whole thing for under seven quid. A soon-to-be award winning game for a pocketful of change is not to be turned down – Hanabi should be sitting on your shelf right now.

Hanabi was first released as Hanabi and Ikebana in 2010. Designed by Antoine Bauza, the English language version is due for release by R&R Games this summer (though this review is based on the German language ABACUSSPIELE edition). Should you want a copy – and if not, why not? – you can grab them from Gameslore for £5.49. Get in on it before it truly hits the big time!

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Spiel des Jahres 2012 – The Nominations!

It’s that time of the year again where a panel of judges huddle around their big table at a secret location somewhere in Germanyand fight it out to decide the shortlist for the Spiel des Jahres. As always, despite it only having been announced a couple of hours ago, the usual bickering has sprung up in various corners of the internet where The Hardcore Gamers declare that everything isn’t as good as it used to be and why was this game nominated and the SdJ don’t know what a good game would be if it bit them on the ass.

Despite the accolade being called the Game of the Year, these people forget that… well, it really isn’t for them. Since the award’s inception back in 1978, its focus has been on nominating and promoting games that are good for families and friends to play together. Sometimes the winners cross over into the kind of things that even the nerdiest of gamers will enjoy – think Ticket to Ride, Dominion and the like. Sometimes the jury picks a comparative stinker (I’ll mention no names) and the world ends YET AGAIN – for those Hardcore gamers at least.

The SdJ panel, every single year, manages to pick a selection of good games. Face it. Sometimes they may not be world beaters, but they’ll at least be fun to play and people – NOT HARDCORE GAMERS – will have a laugh with each other. I’ve seen people complaining that Dominant Species didn’t catch a nomination and I’m now wondering what on earth is wrong with them. It’s a heavy as hell game that takes three or four hours to get through. Don’t get me wrong, I love it, but there’s no way on earth that little Jurgen will settle down for an evening with Papa und Muti when that hits the table…

Of course, last year saw the unveiling of the first Kennerspiel des Jahres, the award for a more advanced game which went to the mighty 7 Wonders. This year’s selection is solid (see below) but again, you’re never doing to see something with 24 page rulebook in 10 point type on the list. Many of the complainers won’t have even played the whole list – I know I certainly haven’t – but that’s not what the SdJ and the accompanying awards are for. They exist to raise awareness, to show off some games that deserve a bit of a mass market boost, and not to pander to some bloke who thinks that anything released after 1995 is crap.

Now after all that, what were the actual nominations?

Well, for the Spiel des Jahres, I reckon it’s a good selection. Donald X. Vaccarino’s Kingdom Builder (Queen) seems to be the early favourite and I’m inclined to agree with the sentiment as it hits all the marks for a good family game. A game of spreading your dominance over certain areas determined by card draw, it’s not overly complex, kids will find it easy to pick up and the random goal selection at the start of a game adds a fair bit of replayability. I’ve played it a few times and while it never shook my world, it was a pleasant way of spending time, especially as an end of the night closer.

Eselsbrucke (Schmidt Spiele) – aka: Donkey Bridge – is a story creation game with an element of memory thrown in for good measure. By using randomly generated pictures, players must make up tales then see if their opponents can recall what the objects were. I can’t recall any other games based around using mnemonics, but Stefan Dorra’s involvement could be enough to see this steal the prize.

Finally, Vegas by Rudiger Dorn (alea) is a total push your luck dicefest. Rolling different numbers allows you to place your dice on various mats, each representing a different casino that contains a certain amount of money. At least one dice must be placed after each roll, then – once everyone is done – whoever has the most dice on a mat claims the cash. It looks like one of the lightest ever nominations for an SdJ, but who’s to say that’s a bad thing? Everyone loves chucking dice about, don’t they?

The Kennerspiel is a bit trickier to call. K2 (rebel.pl) would be my call as I really enjoy Adam Kaluza’s game of conquering the mountain, dealing with the elements and – of course – trying to screw your fellow climbers over. I’m actually a bit surprised to see it put into the slightly heavier category but hope that it’ll actually give the game a well deserved boost in publicity. The combination of hand management and making the right call at the right time – plus the fact it’s playable in less than an hour even with five people – means I’d love to see this take the award.

Village (eggertspiele) has been getting some great press and actually has an English language run due out through Tasty Minstrel Games soon. I’ve had my eye on it for a while and think that it looks like a rather solid Euro, but I must admit a little surprise that it got on the shortlist ahead of Ora et Labora. Hopefully I’ll get it to a table soon and will see why the jury took that call – but the reasons can only be good, surely?

Franz Vohwinkel’s Targi (Kosmos) is a game that I actually know very little about. Again, I was a little surprised to see a strictly two player game on the list (though Friday, Friedemann Friese’s solo game about life on a desert island also made the longlist) but this one looks… I don’t know… a little dry? It seems to follow the ‘get resources, make money’ model, but I won’t venture a full opinion until I get to see it in front on me.

Finally, the younger gamers get a look in with the Kinderspiel des Jahres and there’s only one winner in this for me: Schnappt Hubi! from Ravensburger. This was the first game I played at Essenlast year (with the assistance of a very helpful German lady who translated everything for me and my fellow gamers) and I loved it. You’re trying to hunt down Hubi the ghost as he wanders around a haunted house that you build through the turns. The game is centred around an electronic device that lets you know if you’re bumping into a wall or passing through it safely, involves mice and rabbits, and I want an English version NOW PLEASE RAVENSBURGER PLEASE NOW.

Die kleinen Drachenritter (HUCH! and friends) translates as “The Little Dragon Knight” and looks like it’d be a hit in our house. Stacking games go down very well despite the fact nearly everyone who visits is around thirty years old… Anyway, players have had their gold taken by a dragon and must build piles of stuff to reach a certain height, but piece placement is limited by rules involving colour matching. Definitely one I want to check out.

Finally, for those who enjoy their games with a slightly more disgusting vibe, Kosmos present Klaus Teuber’s Spinnengift und Krotenschleim (“Spider Venom and Toad Slime). Another memory game, it involves recalling where certain required ingredients have been placed to help out a bunch of scatty witches. Correct selections will let players add tokens to the cauldron which will eventually trigger the appearance of monsters – and who doesn’t enjoy that? Again, I want to try it, if only because its designer is a former four times award winner, including taking the 1995 SdJ with Settlers of Catan.

Another year, another bunch of fun sounding games that I can’t wait to play. The Kinderspiel winner will be revealed on June 11, while the two grown up prizes are announced on July 9. But who will it be?

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The View From The Afternoon – 7 Wonders review

I’m pretty sure that the vast majority of gamers out there are at least aware of 7 Wonders even if they haven’t played it (which, of course, a lot of people have). Antoine Bauza’s super-condensed game of city building has gained the respect of many players for several reasons, the main one probably being that it’s able to handle up to seven players at a time yet plays in around thirty to forty minutes. There’s very few games on the market that provide such a range but scale so well, so that’s invariably the reason that it’s scooped so many awards over the past couple of years – including the 2011 Kennerspiel des Jahres.

Each player begins with a play board depicting an ancient wonder of the world, a small amount of money and… well, that’s it. The objective is to build up your own civilisation over the space of three ages, each one represented by a deck of cards. These are shuffled and dealt out, giving each player seven to choose from. This is sorted out before play begins with a little bit of card removal – all cards are marked at the bottom denoting whether they should be included or not. Once you’ve chosen a card you lay it down, pass your deck to the next player, grab the one being handed to you then do it all over again until you’re down to two. With those, you choose one to play and one is discarded.

Brown cards are natural resources, Greys are manufactured. Meanwhile, Yellows allow you to skew the rules in your favour.

These cards can’t be just chosen willy nilly, however. You’ve got to make sure that you’ve got the resources available to put them down in front of you. Everyone begins with a single resource, but as the game progresses you can grab cards to add to your stack. Some cards require one or more resources before you can play them – if they have an image in the top left corner, you’re going to need to either make sure you’ve got that at your disposal. If you don’t, you can check if the player to your left or right has it, then pay them for the privilege. Sure, it may be a pain having to hand over some of your very limited funds, but if it helps you along it’s money well spent.

As you progress through the three Ages, you’ll notice that the cards get more and more powerful – and expensive. There’s one way around this; keep an eye out for stuff that you’ve already built. Some cards give you a free pass to build others, even if you can’t get the necessary bits you would ordinarily need. It’s a great way to build up your points or give you bonuses to use throughout the game, but you still have to make sure you’ve got enough resources to cover yourself for other purchases.

Blues give out plenty of points, Greens are for stacking Science. The Guilds are represented by Purples and could really swing the game your way.

Another element occurs when you end an age; WAR. When the cards run out, it’s time to take on the players to your left and right. Throughout each age you have the potential to pick up red cards that give you shields – if you have more at the end of an age, you’ll get points (one, three or five). If you have less, you’ll grab a minus one token. It’s a good way to pick up some easy points – after all, you only need to stay slightly ahead of those people next to you.

If you’re looking for yet another way of scoring, you can always go down the Sciences route. Green cards have three icons – cogs, tablets and compasses – that could potentially net you some huge points. Collecting a set of all three is good… but getting a bunch of the same is even better as the points scale, squaring as you go; one, four, nine, sixteen… it gets very valuable very quickly. Purple cards represent Guilds and are only available for drafting in Age III and can really give you some huge points too – they’re pretty expensive but could turn the tide your way. Get a couple down in front of you and the game could easily be yours… maybe.

A couple of Wonders - bonuses aplenty are available if you get to build those stages...

Of course, there’s also the Wonders from the game’s title. Depending on which one you draw, there’ll be between one and four levels that will give you a hefty bonus. Instead of putting your chosen card face up before you, as long as you have the resources you can put it underneath your playing board. Some may grant you victory points, others bestow money upon you, while a few give you extra shields or resources. It’s not entirely necessary for you to build your Wonder, but if you choose to leave it behind you’d best make sure you’re working on a few other plans.

Initial games may actually prove a bit confusing. Though the gameplay is incredibly simple – draw a card, play a card, pass the rest around and repeat – there’s such a wealth of options available to you the whole game can feel pretty daunting. Do you grab as many blue cards as possible and boost your points or focus on a military strategy to beat up on your neighbours? Should you go for Science or just concentrate on your Wonder?

Not available in the box! This one's a promo with only one Wonder level... but WHAT a level. The winner of the game has to buy you a beer!

To be honest, every time you play your strategy will be different. There’s so many different possibilities in a game of 7 Wonders that your best bet is really to try and keep an eye on what everyone else is doing, then go down a different path. Obviously this is trickier when you’ve got more players, but that’s what adds to the enjoyment of the game. While your main focus will be on your neighbouring players thanks to the whole war and resources thing, being able to have an eye on the whole playfield will certainly help.

Personally, I’m completely head over heels with this game. I love the fact that it works with such a wide range of players (though I must admit, I haven’t attempted the two player version yet) and is still finished in such a short time; it’s the very definition of a One More Go game. The artwork is solid throughout, as is the graphic design – everything is incredibly clear and simple to follow with splendid iconography.

Being a card game, it’s pretty hard to mess up the production, but thankfully the folks at Repos Productions have made sure that the stock used is nice and thick, the player boards are of good quality and the box insert is actually pretty useful. This review is based on the newer edition of the game, meaning that the wooden coins of the original have been replaced by cardboard bits. Again, these are nicely done, but I’m a sucker for wood – however, I can see why the switch has been made; not only does it save money on production, it also ensures compatibility with expansions that also come with cardboard cash.

Having played it a fair few times, I can see why 7 Wonders has won so many awards since its release. It treads that line between accessibility and slightly more complex games beautifully, open enough for even novice players to pick up quickly but still giving those who seek a challenge plenty to think about. Antoine Bauza has done something that is quite hard to do in the world of game design; he’s managed to create a relatively level playing field. No wonder the plaudits keep coming in… and you can definitely add me to the ever growing list of fans.

7 Wonders was designed by Antoine Bauza with art by Miguel Coimbra. Released in 2010 through Repos Production, between two and seven players can attempt to build their own civilisation in around half an hour. The game can be expanded through the Leaders set which is out now as well as the forthcoming Cities pack; now go and get it, for it is awesome. Oh, and if you’ve got an iPhone, I heartily recommend getting the free 7 Wonders Scorer App which makes life a lot easier at the end of a game!

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